Dr. David Griffin

On A Mission, L.L.C.

Industrial Athlete


This story of photos began with collegiate baseball at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina which then led to two years of Professional Baseball for the Evansville Otters in Evansville, Indiana. David then ventured to the world of bodybuilding where he was crowned South Carolina State Champion and competed at a national level. His next chapter moved him to mixed martial arts fighting where he won the Middleweight Championship, and finished his career as a professional, fighting UFC fighter Houston Alexander.  In more recent journeys through his life he has run half-marathons, marathons, and competed in Sprint, Half-Ironman, and Full Ironman triathlons.  All of these feats play their own significant role in his continued love and dedication to the

"Industrial Athlete".    

The “Industrial Athlete” concept has gained increasing interest over the past decade with more medical professionals focusing on different methods to keep the workforce healthy and injury free.  Professional athletes train their bodies and minds to accomplish extreme feats, so the same should hold true for the “Industrial Athlete”.  The philosophy behind this is for someone to exercise to allow them to perform their professional duties at a high level.  This relates not only to military personnel, police officers, and firefighters who must have the mental and physical capacity to save lives, but it also relates to workers in every profession.  Yes, every profession.  Even if the worker does not perform any physical work in their daily activities, they still must train their body and mind to become stronger.  This not only increases their chances of a better quality of life, but allows them to motivate themselves throughout the day.

 

David’s philosophy on exercise is called “Twice Is Just As Nice”.  What he means by this is that he exercises twice a day, five to six days per week.  When he rises in the morning, he does not drink coffee for a specific reason.  He wants to be able to wake his mind and body with motivation that comes from the inside, not from caffeine.  Some days he exercises as soon as he wakes, and follows that up with a workout at lunch.  On other days he may wait until lunchtime for his first workout, and finish the day with some exercise.    

           

One of David’s daily workouts is very labor intensive to where he is performing high intensity exercise following Crossfit methodology at www.crossfit.com.  The second workout is more of a recovery workout and for mental clarity, where he either swims, bikes, runs, surfs, practices yoga, or does muay thai kickboxing.  These workouts do not take him longer than an hour and thirty minutes total per day.  That is only 45 minutes per session, but most of the time the recovery session is actually only about 20 to 30 minutes. 

 

If you’re saying that you don’t have time in your day to do this, STOP.  Get out of bed an hour earlier, get off of the coach, or stop wasting time going to lunch and go exercise.  You will feel much better about yourself and you will be much more motivated throughout the day.  If you drink coffee all day to keep motivated, then we have some work to do.  Yes, coffee has beneficial health effects, but in moderation.  Come on people, we can do better.  Motivate from the inside.

 

One can’t just jump into this type of routine.  It took David years to get his mind and body capable of performing at this level, but it was worth every second of blood, sweat, and tears.  The pictures on this page are from events throughout his life that have sculpted his mind and his body to be a certain way.  David has always tried to find his limit and see if he can push beyond that limit.  To him, that is what being alive is all about.  You only live once, so you might as well do something exciting and see exactly what you’re made of.  It’s easy for someone to say they can do something, but it’s much more difficult to actually take a leap of faith and DO IT.  Yes, you may fail, but that’s what makes life so beautiful.  If you only do things that you’re good at, you will never know your true self.  Find that activity that absolutely petrifies you and go do it.  When you get to the point of no return and you feel your body shaking, your heart racing, and your mind telling yourself to quit, take that leap of faith and see what it feels like to live. 


Bringing this type of mindset to your exercise routine allows you to identify areas that need improvement, and try activities that you’re not comfortable doing.  Any other type of exercise is setting you up for failure mentally and physically.  So…are you setting yourself up for failure or success?  The choice is yours…make the right one.